Launch of New CEOP Resources – Nude Selfies: What Parents and Carers Need to Know

CEOP have announced the launch of ‘Nude Selfies: What Parents and Carers Need to Know’. This is a series of four short animated films for parents and carers offering advice on how to help keep their children safe from the risks associated with sharing nude and nearly nude images.

The films aim to help parents and carers:

  • Understand young people’s motivations for sending nude selfies.
  • Plan to respond positively and constructively to an incident in which their child has shared a nude selfie.
  • Gain confidence and skills in initiating preventative conversations.
  • Identify risky behaviours or situations and know where to seek help.
  • Know how to get help if a child is at risk after sharing an image.

The Nude Selfies films are accompanied by a guidance pack including a suggested session plan and practitioner guidance for delivering an effective workshop. CEOP encourage practitioners to use all channels available to disseminate these short films to their communities, such as emailing, texting, tweeting links to them from the www.youtube.com/ceop channel.

The films are based on research findings from the European Commission-funded SPIRTO (Self-Produced Images: Risk Taking Online) Project and include:

  • Film One: Understanding Why
  • Film Two: Talking to your child
  • Film Three: When should I be worried?
  • Film Four: How to get help

The films are based on a two-year qualitative investigation led by the University of Edinburgh in partnership with the University of Linköping (Sweden), Innocence in Danger (Germany) and the CEOP Command of the National Crime Agency.

You can download Nude Selfies: What Parents and Carers Need to Know now! You’ll find it under the ‘Parents’ tab in the Resources section of your online account at www.thinkuknow.co.uk/teachers/resources.

On average, CEOP Command receives one report a day of a child protection issue linked to sexting. This might be due to the recipient of a private message forwarding it on to others, a young person posting a revealing image on a website or social media with low privacy settings, or a young person being blackmailed by a stranger over revealing images they have been tricked into taking.

Zoe Hilton, head of safeguarding at the NCA’s CEOP Command, said: “We’re getting reports of difficult and sometimes harmful situations which have come about because of sexting. It can start off as a bit of fun but the issues start when that image gets into the wrong hands. With smartphones and tablets, and new apps emerging all the time, this behaviour is becoming quite normal for teenagers. But it can be alarming for mum and dad who might not know how to help when things go wrong.  We’ve being doing a lot of work to educate young people about some of the consequences of sharing revealing images and videos. Through this campaign, we want to help parents and carers talk to their children about how to minimise the risks, and to make sure the right support is there if things do go wrong.”

Anybody who is worried that a child is being sexually abused can make a report to the NCA via the Safety Centre or by using the Click CEOP button. If you have concerns that a child is in immediate danger please dial 999.

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This entry was posted in CEOP, e-Safety, Parents, Resources, Secondary, Sexting and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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